By Anne Price

Black History Month was created in response to lies told about Black Americans.

Since its inception in 1926, Black History Month has not only served to celebrate overlooked contributions Black people have made in shaping American culture and history, but has also been a movement to correct distortions, falsehoods, and stereotypes about Black people and Black life.

In short, we get one month when it’s “okay” to talk about all the ways anti-blackness permeates our policies, programs, and practices — and that’s woefully inadequate.

We must move beyond a 28-day recognition of the extraordinary achievements of Black people by focusing on how to dismantle anti-blackness year-round. We have to continuously work to lift up the humanity of Black people, and focus on how anti-blackness maintains racial oppression and economic exclusion today, and will continue to do so without a sustained effort to address anti-blackness head on.

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